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Melanie Cole achieves tremendous praise from her students who undertook their study using the Xerte e-learning package.

Melanie Cole

Melanie Cole-learning package.

Newborn airway skills teaching and learning
Second year student midwives are required to demonstrate knowledge and manual dexterity skills in key elements of newborn resuscitation while undertaking the undergraduate module ‘The Compromised Newborn’.  All those responsible for the care of the newborn infant should be able to provide basic assistance including essential airway management to a baby that does not make a normal transition to extra- uterine life.

The ‘4 stage approach’ is a recognised tool to facilitate acquisition of skills in resuscitation of the newborn infant and is advocated by the UK Resuscitation Council (2015).

Stage 1 – a silent demonstration of the skill by the tutor, allows the learner to observe the skill to real time.

Stage 2 – a demonstration with the addition of tutor dialogue, allows deconstruction of the skill and provides rationale for techniques and the structured approach.

Stage 3 – another tutor led demonstration which encourages the learner to verbally predict the next step and provide commentary for the tutor.

Stage 4 allows the learner to perform the skill independently with tutor and peer support.

Planning an online teaching and learning package
With our future learning environment at Waterside and a shift towards blended learning in mind, I explored the prospect of combining video assisted technology with face to face teaching and learning. My aim was to provide Stage 1, 2 and 3 online and bring the students to the university to consolidate learning and practice new skills during scheduled tutor facilitated contact sessions in small groups. While Kaltura enables the students to engage with stages 1 and 2 in viewing pre-recorded demonstrations of the skill, the challenge was related to Stage 3 and in providing an opportunity for students to be able to engage and contribute online. I contacted Anne Misselbrook from the Learning Technology Team and during a meeting we discussed my requirements and vision for the online resource. Anne quickly identified the Xerte learning package as an e-learning tool that would support my needs and enable Stage 1, 2 and 3 to be delivered online.

Selecting the correct mask

Selecting the correct mask

Creating an online package

Andy Stenhouse helped me to create the video of the skill being performed in real time (Stage 1) and the video of the skill being performed with tutor dialogue (Stage 2). The video of the skill in real time was then spilt into 10 smaller clips to enable Stage 3 to be created. The students would then be able to view a small clip and choose an answer from a multiple choice question to predict what should happen next.   A correct answer takes the student to the next clip while an incorrect answer takes them back to the beginning of Stage 3. The student has to answer each question correctly to get to the end of the sequence and they can have as many attempts as they wish, accommodating individual needs and learning styles.

Stage 1 Video

Stage 1 Video

Six months after I contacted the learntech team the final xerte was embedded into NILE within a series of timetabled learning units and was accessed by the pre-registration midwifery students in October 2016.

AirwayManagementTheory

Stage 2

These are some quotes from the students who engaged in an online survey following uptake of the xerte learning tool:

Positive Comments

“I found this learning tool extremely helpful and it had the perfect mix of written information and pictures/videos. I feel this will really help me in my practical assessment, if you got a question wrong you had to go back to the beginning which I thought was a really good idea as it enabled you to revisit information that you may not have completely took in and allowed you to keep going over it until this information has stuck”.

“I think the xerte learning tool is of great benefit as it enabled me to go through the learning stages at my own pace and I am able to revisit the information as often as I want in preparation for my assessment.  I especially found the videos useful and with these found the content easier to understand”.

“I thought it was extremely useful. The videos were excellent. A good variety of media used too which encouraged learning. I found it very helpful”.

“Overall this tool was brilliant to aid our learning and being able to go back to the videos and quizzes will be very helpful before the assessment”.

“I thought the learning tool was excellent and a great help to my understanding of the topic.  So much better than reading a book about it”.

“I believe this to be an excellent method of learning, as you can view the correct way to manage the airway and view it as many times as you wish”.

“A really good learning tool. Easy to follow and in order, making it easy to revise and understand”.

“The videos were really good, easy to understand and clear”.

“I felt the videos very useful especially as I believe I am a visual learner”.

Stage 3

Stage 3

Suggestions for modification

“Instead of going back to the beginning when getting an answer wrong, perhaps just show it is the wrong answer and give another opportunity to select correct answer”.

“Having to go right back to the beginning if you had got a question wrong was slightly frustrating although it did make me remember information so there were definite pros and cons to that process”.

Concluding reflection

Anne provided customised training and valuable support throughout the design and implementation phases. Time for early engagement and collaboration between myself and the Learning Technology Team proved to be vital in the planning, configuring and embedding of Xerte into the module. Inputting theory (text and images) is relatively straightforward on Xerte, creating the activity in Stage 3 and embedding the videos was more complex.

I imagine this approach might be suitable for other practical skills based teaching and learning within the university and I would encourage academic colleagues to give it a try with the support of the Learning Technology Team.

 

Denise Creisson a Project Management Lecturer in the Faculty of Business and Law recently produced a Xerte poster for the FBL Christmas Showcase held on 2 December 2016.

Denise attended Xerte training on 11 August 2016 with Anne Misselbrook the Content Developer at the University, and has been using Xerte e-learning software to produce interactive content for some of the online delivery of BUS2017 Information Technology for Business.

Take a look at the poster created by Denise below.  You can download the PDF version of the Xerte Poster

Xerte Poster created by Denise Creisson, Faculty of Business and Law

Xerte Poster created by Denise Creisson, Faculty of Business and Law

 

 

Our Panopto license has now expired. As already described, all content is in the process of being migrated over to MediaSpace (Kaltura) and will be found at video.northampton.ac.uk.

Thanks to those of you who have already reached out to LearnTech and worked with the team to ensure that all of your video content remains accessible to your students via your NILE sites. No further action should be necessary on your part.

If you have not managed to meet with us, you should be able to replace the Panopto links in your NILE sites as follows:

  1. Go into the NILE module which has a Panopto link

  2. Click on the Tools button

  3. Select Kaltura Media from the menu

  4. Wait a few moments to see your videos displayed on screen

  5. Choose the video you want to link to in the module and click Select *

  6. The next screen lets you edit the Title of the video link

  7. Now click the Submit button

  8. Your MediaSpace video is now live on your NILE site

  9. Check the MediaSpace video plays by clicking Watch Media

  10. Finally, you can now delete the old Panopto link by selecting the drop-down arrow beside the Panopto video link

*If when you select Kaltura Media, the corresponding video does not display, please contact learntech@northampton.ac.uk and we will be happy to find the original file to add it to your account.

In going forward, should you require support in using MediaSpace, training can either provided by your assigned Learning Technologist or you can attend one of the Team’s new LearnTech Lunchtime sessions that will be advertised shortly.

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The Quick Overview:
Where students need to carry out online surveys, and where academic staff do not have a preference as to which tool the students use, we recommend eSurv: http://esurv.org
A tutorial video explaining how to use eSurv is also available here: http://bit.ly/esurv-tutorial

One area where students sometimes come unstuck with their research projects is when they try to extract data from the free online survey tool they have used. While it is often easy to create a simple online survey for free, and easy for a limited number of respondents to take part in the survey, it is not always so easy for the researcher to access their data.

There are a large number of free online survey tools available for use, and choosing the most appropriate one is not always easy. In almost all cases, accessing the full-functionality of the survey tool is not free. For example, the free version of the survey tool may be limited by number and type of questions available (a maximum of ten questions, for example, and only basic questions). It may also be limited to a maximum number of responses (fifty responses per survey, for example). Another common restriction is to limit access to the survey data, and not to allow the researcher to download the data for analysis in a statistical package. While all these restrictions can be overcome by paying a monthly subscription to the survey tool provider, students often feel rather cheated when they find out that it will cost them, in some cases, £60 to download their data for analysis in SPSS. They often feel especially annoyed when they find out that if they chosen different tool they could have had free access to their data.

As part of a recent University of Northampton URB@N project, Paul Rice, Phil Oakman, Clive Howe and Rob Farmer decided to find out whether there was a genuinely free online survey tool out there somewhere. And they decided to make things more difficult by trying to find one that was also easy to use and that stored data in a way that was compliant with the UK Data Protection Act. The good news is that they found one!

If you would like to find out more then you can read all about it in their paper published in the journal MSOR Connections: https://journals.gre.ac.uk/index.php/msor/article/view/311

 

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Solve a Teaching ProblemWe came across this great resource recently, from the Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation Center at Carnegie Mellon University. It’s designed to help academics solve teaching problems through a three-step process:

  • Step 1: Identify a PROBLEM you encounter in your teaching.
  • Step 2: Identify possible REASONS for the problem
  • Step 3: Explore STRATEGIES to address the problem.

To access the site, click on the image, or use this hyperlink: https://www.cmu.edu/teaching/solveproblem/index.html

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This week I have been having a look at making the grade centre easier to read and navigate by applying colours. The grade centre can be a rather complicated beast, particularly when you have large numbers of students and various assignment points within a module. Searching and finding students work can be tricky, students who do not submit can be missed and those students at risk may fall through the net. By applying colour coding to the grade centre columns you can highlight various stages in the grading process including, ‘Needs Grading’, G grades and assessments that have not yet been attempted and let’s face it- a little bit of colour can go a long way!


Colour coding your grade centre can be useful for:

  • Quickly highlighting at risk students

  • A traffic light system to highlight various grades in the grade centre

  • Quickly see students who have not submitted any work and those pieces that need grading

  •  Highlighting marks within a specific range, for example A grade students

  • Spotting students work ‘In Progress’ (usually online tests or online submissions)

  • Quickly being able to see student development (when traffic light system is employed)

 

 To apply colour coding to the grade centre you can follow these quick instructions:

  1. Go to ‘Full Grade Centre’.

  1. Click ‘Manage’ and choose ‘Grading Colour Codes’.

  1. You will now see the Grading Colour Codes page.  Select the box to allow you to add ‘Grading Colour Codes’.

  1. If you want to colour code items that are In Progress, Needs Marking or Exempt, click to change the Background Colour to your chosen colour (keep in mind accessibility issues).

  1. If you want to colour code ranges of marks, click the ‘Add Criteria’ button.  Select the criteria for highlighting:

    • ‘Between’ two grades, ‘More than’ a grade or ‘Less than’ a grade.

    • Choose a Background Colour and a colour for the Text.

  1. If you want to add more criteria, click ‘Add Criteria’ again.

  1. Click ‘Submit’ to apply the colour coding to the Grade Centre.

This will apply all of these settings across the entire module for all assessments (which means you only need to set up your criteria once). You can copy over these settings to other sites when you do a site copy highlighting the ‘Grade centre columns and settings’ option.

For a short video on how to do this follow this link: http://ondemand.blackboard.com/r91/movies/bb91_grade_center_color_code.htm

Go on give it a whirl- and let me know what you think: geraldine.murphy@northampton.ac.uk

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